Freddie Gray

Judge Barry Williams declared Officer Goodson not guilty of second-degree depraved murder on Thursday.

Goodson faces the most serious charges in the Freddie Gray trial, including second-degree “depraved-heart” murder, manslaughter, assault, misconduct in office, and reckless endangerment charges. He opted for a bench trial in early June.

Officer Goodson -- who faces second-degree depraved heart murder as well as manslaughter, assault, misconduct in office and reckless endangerment charges -- was responsible for getting him to a hospital, Porter said.

In the suit, the officers claim that Mosby and Cogen were aware the statement of charges filed against the officers and other statements Mosby made at a May 1, 2015 news conference announcing the charges "were false."

Two of the six Baltimore City police officers charged in connection with the death of Freddie Gray are now suing Baltimore State’s Attorney Marilyn Mosby for defamation and invasion of privacy. The officers filing suit are Sergeant Alicia White and Officer William Porter — both are facing charges of involuntary manslaughter for Gray’s death last April. White […]

Baltimore is on high alert today following a not guilty verdict for one of the six officers charged in the arrest and death of Freddie Gray. Officer Edward Nero was cleared today (Monday) of all charges by Baltimore Circuit Judge Barry Williams.  The charges included assault, misconduct in office and reckless endangerment. Nero, 30, is […]

New developments in the Freddie Gray trials in Baltimore City may have a major impact on the case. The Baltimore Sun reports a memo was sent to prosecutors notifying them that Lisa Phelps, a veteran assistant State’s Attorney, and Sarah David, who joined the office in 2014, were selected to be part of what is called […]

The motion was filed last Thursday (March 31) at the Baltimore City Circuit Court to have Garrett Miller testify at Nero's trial, which will begin May 10. The order was filed since Miller will most likely refuse to take the stand because of his right against self-incrimination, says the report. Prosecutors dealt with similar issues in the case of Officer William Porter.

Traditionally, District Attorneys side with law enforcement when prosecuting crimes. Martin asked Mosby how she balances her role as a prosecutor with the desire to seek justice for the people of Baltimore. Mosby explained, "At the end of the day, the reason I became a prosecutor is because the mission of a prosecutor is to seek justice over convictions."

Porter's lawyers are pushing back against the motion, as they're afraid that the officer can incriminate himself while on the bench.

An appeals court has paused the trial to finish deciding on whether another one of the five other officers that was involved with Gray's death will have to testify.

Jury selection in Baltimore police officer Caesar Goodson's trial is set to begin on Monday in the Freddie Gray case.